The Motherhood Penalty: facts and figures

At the moment, I am in the middle of editing the documentary and I’m adding all the my interviews that I have so far into a rough cut.

Here are some interesting statistics that I found in reports from the Equality and Human Rights Commission and AAT. 

I decided to create a little infographic with all the important facts and figures relating to the motherhood penalty.

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Exposing justice together: Pregnant Then Screwed

Pregnant then Screwed is a place for women to report their discrimination anonymously and get free legal advice from a helpline. The project highlights the on-going mistreatment of pregnant women and mothers in the workplace and the amount of women who are speaking out against it.

I spoke to the founder, Joeli Brearley, who told me more about the project and her advice for women who are experiencing/experienced discrimination in the workplace.

 

British mothers say having children significantly impacted on their careers, study shows

The UK’s leading qualification and membership body for vocational accountants, AAT, released a new survey that examined the attitudes towards women in the modern workplace. The survey found that over half of British mothers feel they have been held back at work after having children.

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The survey involving 2,000 UK mothers, also found that 52% of women who are yet to have children fear that doing so in the future may impact their career.

The survey reported that one in five mothers claimed to have been passed over for promotion and one in ten have been denied a pay rise after giving birth.

One in eight women said they had been told that having kids would be detrimental to their career opportunities, and 12% are putting off having children for the time being as a result.

The AAT have done some extensive research into the issue and have produced a white paper on what employers and employees can do about it. You can find the document here.

 

 

“It is a continuous struggle” Kate Beal

Here’s a little snippet from my interview with CEO of Woodcut Productions, Kate Beal. We talked about how hard it is to have children whilst trying to get far in your career. We also went into depth about how we can solve the motherhood penalty and how flexible working is the way forward. It was lovely to speak to Kate for The Motherhood Paradox and I hope she likes the end product. Keep coming back to this blog for constant updates.

Interview with Joeli Brearley

I am excited to be interviewing the founder of Pregnant then ScrewedJoeli Brearley, this week to talk about her project and her own personal experiences with discrimination.

Pregnant then Screwed is a place for women to report their discrimination anonymously and get free legal advice from a helpline. The project highlights the on-going mistreatment of pregnant women and mothers in the workplace and the amount of women who are speaking out against it.

The volunteers of the group has one mission and that is to eliminate pregnancy and maternity discrimination.

Joeli was made redundant in 2011 when she told her main client about her pregnancy news and without any further communication she was sacked.

I will be discussing her mistreatment whilst also finding out more about the Pregnant then Screwed project and how it has opened up a dialogue into the struggles of being a mother in the workplace.

 

#WorkingForward campaign

The Equality and Human Rights Commission have launched the new campaign, Working Forward, that will make sure that the workplace is the best they can be for pregnant women and new mothers.

The drive is led by British businesses that are trying to point the industry in the right direction regarding pregnancy and maternity rights.

Reports showed that 84% of business said they supported pregnant women and those on maternity leave, which compares to the 77% of mothers who told the Equality and Human Rights Commission that they had a negative or discriminatory experience at work.

The Royal Mail, Barclays, BT and HSBC have supported the campaign to make the best workplace for pregnant women and new mothers. You can see the progress on the EHRC website or follow #WorkingForward hashtag on Twitter.

Interview with Amy Shaw

My next interview will be with Amy Shaw, an employment lawyer from Southampton, who will be talking to me about maternity discrimination and the procedures of discrimination tribunals.

She works at the DC Employment Solicitors firm in Southampton and loves being an employment lawyer.

She is pregnant herself so she can give me her personal view on maternity discrimination and if she has fears for the future for working mums.

Interview with Jessica Chivers

In a couple of weeks, I will be interviewing coaching psychologist and author Jessica Chivers.

She is the author of the bestselling book ‘Mothers Work!’, which helps women make a smooth return back to work. The mother of two wrote the book after she became a mother in 2006.

I will be asking her about her book and how she helps women with their transition back into work after having children. She has 13 years of experience as a coaching psychologist making her interview a great addition to my documentary.

She has appeared on the BBC and on several radio stations as an expert. I will be able to talk to her in depth about women’s pay and childcare costs as she has been interviewed about these subjects for other organisations.

Interview with Kate Beal

Next week, I will be interviewing CEO Kate Beal about her career and having children. She is the CEO of Woodcut Productions, based in Eastleigh.

I will be asking her questions about how she became the CEO of the production company and how she struggled with having children at the same time.

I will go further and ask if she has had any obstacles that have affected her career or if she has faced any discrimination in the past due to having children.

Keep looking on the blog for a snippet of the interview next week.

What is the motherhood penalty?

Now for the BIG question, what is the motherhood penalty?

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Wayne Jones

 

Sociologists have come up with the term ‘The Motherhood Penalty’ to explain how women encounter discrimination in the workplace in terms of wages, employment, and job promotion.

According to the Fawcett Society, from now until christmas women technically working for free due to the gender pay gap. Women may suffer a per child pay penalty depending on how many children they decide to have.