The Final Cut

Here is the final cut of my documentary The Motherhood Paradox.

Thank you Joeli, Jessica, Kate, Amy, John and Kamaljeet for being a part of my documentary and talking to me so openly about your own personal stories and experiences.

Unfortunately due to time restrictions I had to take out my interview with Frances and Toby Kemp. They will be added in the extended cut that will be posted later on this year.

I hope you enjoy it!

Don’t forget to share on Facebook and tweet the documentary.

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Final thoughts

Now that the documentary has been edited and is ready to be published. I thought I would reflect on what I’ve found out and what I’ve learned since starting the project in October.

At first, I did not know that the motherhood penalty actually existed but looking at the vast amount of responses I am getting on social media tells me otherwise. I started the documentary after talking to a friend about the career and children situation and my response was that I was going to wait until I was high up in my career but then I might have second thoughts about having a child at that particular time as well. My friend said she wasn’t planning to have children at all. It then occurred to me that I shouldn’t be having to schedule a baby around my career and figure out the best time to have a child because there is never a best time.

As my documentary progressed, some amazing conferences and meetings have been happening that are discussing the issue of discrimination. The Women and Equalities Committee and the Equality and Human Rights Commission have started running campaigns and conventions to end discrimination against mothers in the workplace.

Looking at the statistics from organisations like EHRC and going through my own survey results, they have a clear correlation that women are not fighting against discrimination and believe that having children will be detrimental to their career.

I’m hoping that my documentary will inform other women of their rights especially after they become a mother and show women that they are not alone.

Disadvantages in pay, employment and job promotion are still happening to women across the world. It is an ongoing issue that will continue to appear in the media until something is done about it.

Interview with stay-at-home dad John Adams

When I was getting all my interviews I felt as if my documentary was missing something. All my interviews up until this point were all from the working mother’s perspective. I decided I would get in touch with a stay-at-home dad to see the reversed roles of the stereotypical breadwinner and homemaker.

I recently talked to John Adams who is a stay-at-home dad based in London. He gave up his career in communications so that his wife could flourish in hers. John has recently won the UK Dad Blog of the year where he writes about his life as a stay-at-home dad.

When I asked my previous interviewees about how we should solve the mother pay gap, John had a different view on the matter. Listen to John here: